Teacher

Teacher & Student Save Student in School

Posted by cocreator on June 21, 2014
Events / No Comments

Due to reinforced training and the immediate response by two Spillane Middle School staff members, a seventh-grade student who went into cardiac arrest during school is alive and well, and back among fellow students.


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The student collapsed on Spillane’s main staircase in between classes on Feb. 28. DMC teacher Sean Stiewert and school nurse Becky Cushen reacted immediately and worked together to help sustain her life in the critical moments before paramedics arrived.

Stiewert, whose classroom is adjacent to the bottom of the staircase, entered the lobby at 10:07 a.m. that Friday morning—the end of second period—to see a group of students stopped on the stairs, collectively pointing toward the bottom three steps where the student had fallen.

Sean Stiewert Becky Cushen the Saviours

Sean Stiewert Becky Cushen the Saviours

“That’s when that ‘coach’s voice’ came out of me pretty loudly,” said Stiewert, a 17-year CFISD veteran and longtime club swim coach. “I told everyone to clear out and use the back staircase, and instructed a student to go get Becky.”

While one staff member called 911, another retrieved one of the school’s six automated external defibrillators (AEDs) so Cushen and Stiewert—both CPR certified—could begin resuscitation.

Cushen, a registered nurse of 28 years who has served CFISD for 4 ½, made the assessment to roll the student onto her back, then immediately began chest compressions.

“We went right into exactly what we had been taught,” Cushen said. “I knew Sean knew CPR just like me, and that made it easy to trust her as we worked together.”

Stiewert followed the AED’s instructions, applying both pads to the student’s chest and clearing space between them and the student while the defibrillator administered a shock.

While still unconscious, the student developed a faint pulse and breaths. The AED instructed Stiewert and Cushen to continue CPR, which they did for what Stiewert estimated was 11 minutes before EMT personnel arrived.

Without the intervention of Spillane staff, she likely would not have survived.

“Their response was immediate, professional and absolutely saved that girl’s life. There’s no question about it,” said Bevin Gordon, CFISD director of health services. “The specific rhythm that the student’s heart was in required a shock from an AED to recover. If she had been anywhere else where an AED was not present, she may not have recovered.”

Shortly following the incident, CFISD support staff and counselors checked in on Stiewert and Cushen. While they were given the option to go home, both stayed for the remainder of the school day.

“I wanted to stay because I didn’t want to just be sitting at home thinking about what had happened,” Stiewert said.

Agreed Cushen, “What if something else had happened again and I had gone home? If someone needed my help I wanted to be there.”

The student was in good spirits and smiling by the time Stiewert and Cushen went to visit her in the hospital with other Spillane teachers the next day.

“I just wanted to hug her,” Stiewert said. “There was a ton of weight lifted off me as soon as I saw her smiling. That’s when I knew everything was good.”

As a result of their actions, Stiewert and Cushen were recognized by the CFISD Board of Trustees during their regularly scheduled meeting on March 13. Dr. Mark Henry, superintendent of schools, presented each of them with the Superintendent Challenge Coin for going above and beyond their normal duties.

“Our number one goal in this district is making sure our students are safe,” Dr. Henry said at the meeting. “Thanks to people like you on our campuses, you are helping fulfill that goal in CFISD.”

The student returned to Spillane this Tuesday to the delight of both Stiewert and Cushen, who are reluctant to claim the spotlight as life-saving heroes.

“A hero is someone who jumps in when their life is in danger. Ours weren’t,” Cushen said. “I feel like I’m just doing my job. I’m really happy I was there. We were in the right place at the right time, and I don’t think it could have gone any smoother.”Due to reinforced training and the immediate response by two Spillane Middle School staff members, a seventh-grade student who went into cardiac arrest during school is alive and well, and back among fellow students.

The student collapsed on Spillane’s main staircase in between classes on Feb. 28. DMC teacher Sean Stiewert and school nurse Becky Cushen reacted immediately and worked together to help sustain her life in the critical moments before paramedics arrived.

Stiewert, whose classroom is adjacent to the bottom of the staircase, entered the lobby at 10:07 a.m. that Friday morning—the end of second period—to see a group of students stopped on the stairs, collectively pointing toward the bottom three steps where the student had fallen.

“That’s when that ‘coach’s voice’ came out of me pretty loudly,” said Stiewert, a 17-year CFISD veteran and longtime club swim coach. “I told everyone to clear out and use the back staircase, and instructed a student to go get Becky.”

While one staff member called 911, another retrieved one of the school’s six automated external defibrillators (AEDs) so Cushen and Stiewert—both CPR certified—could begin resuscitation.

Cushen, a registered nurse of 28 years who has served CFISD for 4 ½, made the assessment to roll the student onto her back, then immediately began chest compressions.

“We went right into exactly what we had been taught,” Cushen said. “I knew Sean knew CPR just like me, and that made it easy to trust her as we worked together.”

Stiewert followed the AED’s instructions, applying both pads to the student’s chest and clearing space between them and the student while the defibrillator administered a shock.

While still unconscious, the student developed a faint pulse and breaths. The AED instructed Stiewert and Cushen to continue CPR, which they did for what Stiewert estimated was 11 minutes before EMT personnel arrived.

Without the intervention of Spillane staff, she likely would not have survived.

“Their response was immediate, professional and absolutely saved that girl’s life. There’s no question about it,” said Bevin Gordon, CFISD director of health services. “The specific rhythm that the student’s heart was in required a shock from an AED to recover. If she had been anywhere else where an AED was not present, she may not have recovered.”

Shortly following the incident, CFISD support staff and counselors checked in on Stiewert and Cushen. While they were given the option to go home, both stayed for the remainder of the school day.

“I wanted to stay because I didn’t want to just be sitting at home thinking about what had happened,” Stiewert said.

Agreed Cushen, “What if something else had happened again and I had gone home? If someone needed my help I wanted to be there.”

The student was in good spirits and smiling by the time Stiewert and Cushen went to visit her in the hospital with other Spillane teachers the next day.

“I just wanted to hug her,” Stiewert said. “There was a ton of weight lifted off me as soon as I saw her smiling. That’s when I knew everything was good.”

As a result of their actions, Stiewert and Cushen were recognized by the CFISD Board of Trustees during their regularly scheduled meeting on March 13. Dr. Mark Henry, superintendent of schools, presented each of them with the Superintendent Challenge Coin for going above and beyond their normal duties.

“Our number one goal in this district is making sure our students are safe,” Dr. Henry said at the meeting. “Thanks to people like you on our campuses, you are helping fulfill that goal in CFISD.”

The student returned to Spillane this Tuesday to the delight of both Stiewert and Cushen, who are reluctant to claim the spotlight as life-saving heroes.

“A hero is someone who jumps in when their life is in danger. Ours weren’t,” Cushen said. “I feel like I’m just doing my job. I’m really happy I was there. We were in the right place at the right time, and I don’t think it could have gone any smoother.”

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School Staff Save Teen at Track Practice

Posted by cocreator on June 04, 2014
Events / No Comments

There was a big scare on a New Jersey high school track Wednesday after a student collapsed during practice.


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As CBS 2’s Don Champion reported Wednesday night, working with student athletes at Pascack Hills High School has been Steven Papa’s mission. He hoped he never had to save one, but on Wednesday he did.

“I wasn’t sure what to expect when I got up there,” Papa said in a telephone interview.

Around 3:30 p.m., the 15-year-old boy was taking part in track practice behind Pascack Hills High School when he collapsed.

The teen was training with a former student at the time who happened to be a trained EMT, Champion reported.

The former student performed CPR while Papa rushed to the field with a defibrillator.

“I pressed the shock button to give him a shock, and once that was happening, it gave him a pulse rate back,” Papa said. “He had to continue CPR for a little while after that.”

The combined efforts brought back a strong pulse. Principal Glenn deMarrais witnessed it all.

“Your heart’s in your throat, because you don’t know what you’re going to find,” deMarrais said.

Pascack Hills high is ahead of schedule in meeting Janet’s Law. By September of this year, it requires New Jersey schools to have defibrillators within range during student athletic practices and events.

“I really think that this is a good example of when we have practices and the case where our staff, our coaching staff, is trained in CPR, we have a defibrillator on site, as well as making sure we have a certified trainer on site,” School Superintendent Eric Gundersen told CBS 2. “In unfortunate circumstances like this, we’re able to respond in a quick and efficient manner.”

The law is named after Janet Zilinski, an 11-year-old who died in 2006 shortly after cheerleading practice.

“This is the perfect example of the importance of having that defibrillator and being prepared,” deMarrais said. “You never think it’s going to happen to you.”

The boy was not identified Wednesday night. He was breathing on his own when he was taken to The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood.

At last check, he was stable and becoming more responsive.

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Teacher Save 15 Year Old at School Athletics Carnival

Posted by cocreator on June 04, 2014
Events / No Comments

Despite being just 15, Billy Sawyer had fallen victim to a heart attack — a condition which some experts believe could be underestimated in young people.

Billy Sawyer the Survivor

Billy Sawyer the Survivor

Billy said he felt “a bit dizzy” after placing fourth in the 100m race at his school athletics carnival on Wednesday but went on to compete in the long jump “without any problems”.

“I remember lining up for the 200m and I have a vague image in my head of running but that’s all I remember … Then I woke up in hospital,” Billy said.

He ran but as he crossed the line, Billy collapsed face-first on the ground in front of shocked students and onlookers.

Mr Lawicki, the Year 10 PE teacher at St Peter’s Catholic College Tuggerah Lakes, ran to help and found Billy convulsing on the ground.

But the situation turned “very serious” when Billy stopped breathing, the colour drained from his face and Mr Lawicki — a first-aid and resuscitation trainer with years of experience — could not find a pulse.

“I launched into (CPR) aggressively, that’s the way we teach it, you’re better off doing something than nothing,” he said.

Mr Lawicki managed to get Billy’s heart started again and breathing and he was flown to The Children’s Hospital, Westmead. Billy has undergone a series of tests and has more to come as teams of neurological and cardiovascular experts try and pin down exactly what sparked the collapse.

Heading the investigation is his doctor, Dr Yew Wee Chua, who said it appeared Billy didn’t have a heart attack in the conventional sense — it was more an interference with the “electrical conduction of the heart”.

“The good thing his teacher Mr Lawicki could do CPR,” Dr Chua said yesterday.

Professor of medicine at the George Institute and Sydney University Vlado Perkovic said while heart attacks in young people were rare, they were not unheard of.

International studies estimated the risk of cardiac arrest in young people at about one in 100,000.

Professor Perkovic said heart attacks were often the cause of sudden and unexpected deaths in young people but went undiagnosed and the cause of death incorrectly attributed to a head injury or other coinciding condition.

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School Staff & PE Teacher Interviewee Save Student

Posted by cocreator on March 29, 2014
Events / No Comments

IT WASN’T quite the test she was expecting when she was interviewed for a top job at a Hampshire school.


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But today a Hampshire schoolboy has her to thank for the fact he is alive – after he collapsed and suffered a heart attack on the sports hall floor.

PE teacher Emma Denham, below, was being observed taking a class as part of the interview process at Mountbatten School, in Romsey, when Sam Mangoro’s heart stopped, sending him into cardiac arrest.

Emma Denham the Saviour

Emma Denham the Saviour

But quick-thinking Emma, along with three other members of staff, ran to his aid and gave him life-saving CPR using a defibrillator that the school had only purchased a few months before.

It was their courage and ability to put their training into practice under such immense pressure, along with the fact that the school had a defibrillator, that saved the 16-yearold’s life say doctors.

Sam, below, was last night being slowly woken up from a medically induced coma, which he has been in since the incident on Thursday, but his parents are hopeful thanks to the teachers who gave him the best possible chance of making a full recovery.

His dad Michael told the Daily Echo: “We would like to thank every single member of staff from the school from the bottom of our hearts.

“They have given us our son back, because without them we wouldn’t have him.

“We are quietly optimistic because the critical thing was that the treatment he received at the school from the teachers was absolutely incredible and that’s given him every fighting chance.”

He added: “They did an absolutely amazing and wonderful thing under immense pressure and I am sure in what must have been a lot of fear.”

The drama happened on Thursday afternoon when Emma Denham was being observed by two other teachers – Jon Neale and deputy head Joanna Scott – as she took a class in the gym.

Just a few minutes in, after the children had warmed-up, Sam suddenly stopped breathing and collapsed.

Within seconds he was being given CPR by Emma, support staff and first aiders Lyn Lovell and Janet Barrett and assistant deputy head Mark Chance.

Mrs Scott immediately ran to get the defibrillator – which the school had only bought a matter of months before – and Mr Neale ran outside to direct the paramedics.

The teenager had to be shocked four times to restart his heart and the team were able to get him stable enough for paramedics to get him in an ambulance and to Southampton General Hospital.

Mrs Scott told the Daily Echo: “Everything just seemed to be in slow motion but we just did everything we possibly could. The other children were just amazing and were so sensible, all leaving the gymso we could work on Sam.

“We are all still very emotional about it, but at the time you don’t think. Autopilot just sets in and you get on with what you need to do.

“It is overwhelming to think about what we did but we were all part of a team that helped to save Sam’s life.

“What is important is that we get the message out there that every single school needs a defibrillator.”

Head teacher Heather McIlroy, below, soon received a call from one of the consultants treating Sam to praise her staff, who, he said, had saved the teenager’s life.

Mrs McIlroy, who told the Daily Echo that, regrettably, Miss Denham did not get the job despite her heroics, said: “It is nothing short of a miracle.

“The stars had truly aligned in Sam’s favour, because not only were there three teachers in the class who knew exactly what to do, we had only had the defibrillator for a matter of months.

“What makes me so proud as a head teacher is to have the paramedics and doctors say to me that it was the swift action of my teachers that saved his life.

“It is a wonderful story of having the right equipment and the trained staff who had the courage to take action.”

She added: “The entire school community is thinking about Sam and his parents and are looking forward to getting him back.”

Since his cardiac arrest, Sam’s parents, Michael and Lynda, who have three younger sons, have held a bedside vigil.

But they also took a short time out to go to the school on Friday to personally thank all of the staff who kept their son alive.

Michael, from Romsey, added: “We just wanted to show them our gratitude.

We will never be able to repay them for what they have done, they have been amazing because they are not medical professionals, yet they did this.

“Their actions have really given us the opportunity to hope.

“We are just thankful that luck was on his side on that day because he was in the right place at the right time, with people who were trained to know what to do.

“Had he being walking home from school alone, or if the school hadn’t had a defibrillator it could have been a lot different. It is incredible and we feel so fortunate for that.”

Sam, a bright pupil who is studying for his GCSE’s, was yesterday said to be slowly waking from the coma but his dad said that it was still early days.

But Sam has always been a fighter.

When he was just ten days old, he was left fighting for his life when a virus damaged his heart, causing him to need medication for the rest of his life.

Back then his parents were warned that he would need a heart transplant by the time he was ten, but Sam proved them wrong and this is the first time his condition has caused him to suffer a cardiac arrest.

As well as praise from doctors and paramedics, the teachers at Mountbatten School, who have already ordered two more defibrillators, have also been commended by the head of education at Hampshire County Council, Councillor Peter Edgar.

He said: “I wish Sam a safe and successful recovery and am delighted that one of our schools has been complimented by the health profession that they carried out correct life-saving procedures.

“The school should be congratulated for the action they took during what must have been very traumatic circumstances.”

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Teacher Saves Another Teacher at Volleyball Game

Posted by cocreator on March 11, 2014
Events / No Comments

Hershey Middle School teacher Beth Shay saved the life of Fink Elementary School teacher Kathy Hutchinson during a Feb. 9 volleyball tournament, and this week the two met for lunch so Kathy Hutchinson could say “thank-you.”

Beth Shay the Saviour

Beth Shay the Saviour

Hutchinson collapsed while watching the finals of her daughter’s volleyball game in Lancaster. Her husband Mike, the team’s coach, called 911 while the players in the 14 and under club team looked on, aghast.

Shay, the mother of a player on the opposite team, started CPR, and kept at it until the EMTs arrived with a defibrillator.

“I don’t remember that day at all, nothing until the following Thursday,” Hutchinson said Saturday. “It was nice to meet her. I was unconscious the other time.”

Another parent who was there was Anne Reeves, whose daughter plays on the same team as Shay’s daughter.

She brought Shay’s accomplishment to the attention of Derry Twp. School District superintendent Joe McFarland, who honored Shay at Monday’s school board meeting.

Reeves, who spoke during the meeting, said Shay was “fearless, courageous, selfless.”

“What she did was save a life,” Reeve said.

McFarland said Shay was “an example to adults and students.”

Shay, who teaches sixth grade health and phys ed, said after the meeting that she was trained in CPR, but never expected to use it.

At the time, she didn’t think much about what she was doing, she said. It was just sort of automatic.

Hutchinson, 41, who teaches first grade at Fink Elementary School in the Middletown Area School District, said the doctors are still not sure what happened. They have implanted an AED device in her heart so that, in case it ever happens again, it will automatically shock her heart into beating.

“They ran every test,” she said. “Perhaps there was an irregular rhythm and my heart couldn’t get it back again, but there was nothing definitive.”

She was released from the hospital Feb. 18, but went back in shortly for a blood clot in her leg.

She came home for good Feb. 21. She goes back to the cardiologist March 23, and then she will find out if she can return to the classroom.

“I like my job. I love the little ones. They still enjoy school,” she said.

She has been back to watch another volleyball tournament, partly to show the girls and their parents that she is all right and set their minds at ease.

She said she is feeling good, just a little tired and sore. And terribly grateful to Shay.

“I’m just thankful she was there and she was knowledgeable,” she said. “It could have been so much worse.”

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