Preteen

Teacher & Student Save Student in School

Posted by cocreator on June 21, 2014
Events / No Comments

Due to reinforced training and the immediate response by two Spillane Middle School staff members, a seventh-grade student who went into cardiac arrest during school is alive and well, and back among fellow students.


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The student collapsed on Spillane’s main staircase in between classes on Feb. 28. DMC teacher Sean Stiewert and school nurse Becky Cushen reacted immediately and worked together to help sustain her life in the critical moments before paramedics arrived.

Stiewert, whose classroom is adjacent to the bottom of the staircase, entered the lobby at 10:07 a.m. that Friday morning—the end of second period—to see a group of students stopped on the stairs, collectively pointing toward the bottom three steps where the student had fallen.

Sean Stiewert Becky Cushen the Saviours

Sean Stiewert Becky Cushen the Saviours

“That’s when that ‘coach’s voice’ came out of me pretty loudly,” said Stiewert, a 17-year CFISD veteran and longtime club swim coach. “I told everyone to clear out and use the back staircase, and instructed a student to go get Becky.”

While one staff member called 911, another retrieved one of the school’s six automated external defibrillators (AEDs) so Cushen and Stiewert—both CPR certified—could begin resuscitation.

Cushen, a registered nurse of 28 years who has served CFISD for 4 ½, made the assessment to roll the student onto her back, then immediately began chest compressions.

“We went right into exactly what we had been taught,” Cushen said. “I knew Sean knew CPR just like me, and that made it easy to trust her as we worked together.”

Stiewert followed the AED’s instructions, applying both pads to the student’s chest and clearing space between them and the student while the defibrillator administered a shock.

While still unconscious, the student developed a faint pulse and breaths. The AED instructed Stiewert and Cushen to continue CPR, which they did for what Stiewert estimated was 11 minutes before EMT personnel arrived.

Without the intervention of Spillane staff, she likely would not have survived.

“Their response was immediate, professional and absolutely saved that girl’s life. There’s no question about it,” said Bevin Gordon, CFISD director of health services. “The specific rhythm that the student’s heart was in required a shock from an AED to recover. If she had been anywhere else where an AED was not present, she may not have recovered.”

Shortly following the incident, CFISD support staff and counselors checked in on Stiewert and Cushen. While they were given the option to go home, both stayed for the remainder of the school day.

“I wanted to stay because I didn’t want to just be sitting at home thinking about what had happened,” Stiewert said.

Agreed Cushen, “What if something else had happened again and I had gone home? If someone needed my help I wanted to be there.”

The student was in good spirits and smiling by the time Stiewert and Cushen went to visit her in the hospital with other Spillane teachers the next day.

“I just wanted to hug her,” Stiewert said. “There was a ton of weight lifted off me as soon as I saw her smiling. That’s when I knew everything was good.”

As a result of their actions, Stiewert and Cushen were recognized by the CFISD Board of Trustees during their regularly scheduled meeting on March 13. Dr. Mark Henry, superintendent of schools, presented each of them with the Superintendent Challenge Coin for going above and beyond their normal duties.

“Our number one goal in this district is making sure our students are safe,” Dr. Henry said at the meeting. “Thanks to people like you on our campuses, you are helping fulfill that goal in CFISD.”

The student returned to Spillane this Tuesday to the delight of both Stiewert and Cushen, who are reluctant to claim the spotlight as life-saving heroes.

“A hero is someone who jumps in when their life is in danger. Ours weren’t,” Cushen said. “I feel like I’m just doing my job. I’m really happy I was there. We were in the right place at the right time, and I don’t think it could have gone any smoother.”Due to reinforced training and the immediate response by two Spillane Middle School staff members, a seventh-grade student who went into cardiac arrest during school is alive and well, and back among fellow students.

The student collapsed on Spillane’s main staircase in between classes on Feb. 28. DMC teacher Sean Stiewert and school nurse Becky Cushen reacted immediately and worked together to help sustain her life in the critical moments before paramedics arrived.

Stiewert, whose classroom is adjacent to the bottom of the staircase, entered the lobby at 10:07 a.m. that Friday morning—the end of second period—to see a group of students stopped on the stairs, collectively pointing toward the bottom three steps where the student had fallen.

“That’s when that ‘coach’s voice’ came out of me pretty loudly,” said Stiewert, a 17-year CFISD veteran and longtime club swim coach. “I told everyone to clear out and use the back staircase, and instructed a student to go get Becky.”

While one staff member called 911, another retrieved one of the school’s six automated external defibrillators (AEDs) so Cushen and Stiewert—both CPR certified—could begin resuscitation.

Cushen, a registered nurse of 28 years who has served CFISD for 4 ½, made the assessment to roll the student onto her back, then immediately began chest compressions.

“We went right into exactly what we had been taught,” Cushen said. “I knew Sean knew CPR just like me, and that made it easy to trust her as we worked together.”

Stiewert followed the AED’s instructions, applying both pads to the student’s chest and clearing space between them and the student while the defibrillator administered a shock.

While still unconscious, the student developed a faint pulse and breaths. The AED instructed Stiewert and Cushen to continue CPR, which they did for what Stiewert estimated was 11 minutes before EMT personnel arrived.

Without the intervention of Spillane staff, she likely would not have survived.

“Their response was immediate, professional and absolutely saved that girl’s life. There’s no question about it,” said Bevin Gordon, CFISD director of health services. “The specific rhythm that the student’s heart was in required a shock from an AED to recover. If she had been anywhere else where an AED was not present, she may not have recovered.”

Shortly following the incident, CFISD support staff and counselors checked in on Stiewert and Cushen. While they were given the option to go home, both stayed for the remainder of the school day.

“I wanted to stay because I didn’t want to just be sitting at home thinking about what had happened,” Stiewert said.

Agreed Cushen, “What if something else had happened again and I had gone home? If someone needed my help I wanted to be there.”

The student was in good spirits and smiling by the time Stiewert and Cushen went to visit her in the hospital with other Spillane teachers the next day.

“I just wanted to hug her,” Stiewert said. “There was a ton of weight lifted off me as soon as I saw her smiling. That’s when I knew everything was good.”

As a result of their actions, Stiewert and Cushen were recognized by the CFISD Board of Trustees during their regularly scheduled meeting on March 13. Dr. Mark Henry, superintendent of schools, presented each of them with the Superintendent Challenge Coin for going above and beyond their normal duties.

“Our number one goal in this district is making sure our students are safe,” Dr. Henry said at the meeting. “Thanks to people like you on our campuses, you are helping fulfill that goal in CFISD.”

The student returned to Spillane this Tuesday to the delight of both Stiewert and Cushen, who are reluctant to claim the spotlight as life-saving heroes.

“A hero is someone who jumps in when their life is in danger. Ours weren’t,” Cushen said. “I feel like I’m just doing my job. I’m really happy I was there. We were in the right place at the right time, and I don’t think it could have gone any smoother.”

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9 Year Old Saves Father by Stomping on Chest

Posted by cocreator on May 31, 2014
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A 9-year-old-girl has been hailed a hero after saving her father’s life by kicking him when his heart stopped.

Izzy McCarron stamped on her father Colm’s chest when she realized she wasn’t strong to get his heart going with her arms.

Her father had suffered a mysterious allergic reaction, reports Metro.

“I just kicked him really hard,” said Izzy. “My mum taught me CPR but I knew I wasn’t strong enough to use hands. I was quite scared.”

“My mum said that he was going to hospital with a giant footprint on his chest,” she added.

Doctors think Izzy’s father may have developed the allergic condition anaphylaxis, reports Metro.

For her efforts, Izzy, from Derbyshire, central England, has received an “outstanding bravery” award from her school.

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Coach & Cop Save Boy at Baseball Game

Posted by cocreator on February 19, 2014
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A nine-year-old boy has an inspirational message for his baseball coach and the other man who saved his life. When he collapsed, the two heroes didn’t think twice about doing whatever it took to keep the child alive.

Philadelphia News, Weather and Sports from WTXF FOX 29

It was a field of dreams, but it turned into a nightmare for Carlos Ramos and his wife Micki.

“It was absolutely the worst experience of my life and one I wish that no parent has to go through,” says Micki Ramos.

Ramos’ son TJ collapsed last Thursday during baseball practice at FC Byrne Park. Doctors say the nine-year-old boy suffered a heart attack due to a genetic Condition called CPVT.

“He wasn’t breathing for two to three minutes,” says Carlos Ramos.

TJ’S coach John Callahan and another parent, both of whom happen to be Philadelphia Police officers, raced into action trying to revive young TJ with CPR.

“They were checking his temp, and realized his fingers were turning blue,” says Carlos Ramos

Ramos says as his son’s life slipped away, but the policemen wouldn’t give up.

“The other officer gave him compressions to keep him breathing, keep him going,” says Ramos.” Without that, unfortunately, we wouldn’t be here, TJ wouldn’t be here and we’d be at diff location.”

On Wednesday, the nine-year-old boy underwent surgery for a defibrillator implant. Coach Callahan visited TJ at CHOP days after saving his life. The nine-year old even recorded a touching video for the officers, expressing his gratitude.

“Thanks coach Callahan and Coach Pasquerello for saving my life… thanks for giving me CPR…KISS” the boy said.

“They saved my son’s life. They gave me my life back. I’m forever indebted to them,” Micki Ramos says.

“Definitely want to thank Callahan and Pasquerello they saved our kid’s life, so we owe them our life,” Carlos Ramos says.

It’ll be a while before TJ steps back onto the baseball field, but his teammates say that now they’re playing for more than just a win.

TJ’S family hopes he’ll be home soon after he starts rehab next week to make sure his motor skills are ok. TJ is anxious to get back to playing catcher for his team. He’ll have to wear a specially padded chest protector in order to do it.

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Family Friend Saves Child from Choking

Posted by cocreator on February 10, 2014
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A Super Bowl party turned to panic for a Covington family after their 3-year-old daughter choked on a meatball and they now credit the quick-thinking actions of a guest with saving that child’s life.

“It was close to the end of the first quarter and Connor, my 4-year-old son, came downstairs and was like ‘Mom, Sydney’s making weird noises’ and I didn’t think anything of it,” said Bree Fontenot who mentioned the adults frequently checked on the children during the party.

At that point, Fontenot’s friend, Bri Webb, decided to see what was going on.

“I walked up the stairs fully expecting to walk into some kind of pretend crawling around game and that’s not what was happening,” said Webb who found Sydney lying at the top of the stairs.

“She just didn’t look well,” said Webb. “When I got her up into the bathroom I thought she was going to throw up and when I brought her to the bathroom I realized she was not getting air and there was a problem,” said Webb.

Webb called Fontenot to come upstairs and that’s when Fontenot realized there was an emergency.

“It wasn’t until I walked into the bathroom and she was doing the Heimlich on Sydney – had her bent over her arm,” said Fontenot. “I was like freaked out. I just kept telling her ‘Save her.’ ”

During the Heimlich maneuver, Sydney went limp. Her mom tried to scoop pieces of a meatball from the child’s mouth but Sydney stopped breathing. Webb then began CPR.

“When I gave her the first breath I watched her chest rise and fall so I knew she was getting air,” said Webb.

Webb gave Sydney four or five more breaths and said the girl was breathing on her own before medics arrived.

“I’m pretty sure I said ‘Yes!’ I think I might have cheered louder for her than I had cheered in the first quarter of the game. I was so, so relieved and so happy,” said Webb who is now credited with saving Sydney’s life – a week after she renewed her CPR certification.

“That’s definitely what saved her life. Definitely. She got in and saw the chest rise,” said Gabe Debay who is a Shoreline firefighter and taught Webb’s recent CPR class.

“Honestly, it’s hard to hold back tears because I teach lots and lots of people but you never really hear the good stories and the good outcomes,” said Debay.

Sydney’s family now encourages others to get CPR certified and to take your child’s concerns seriously.

“Listen to your children because if we all would have just blown off Connor when he said that Sydney was making weird noises it could have been so much different,” said Fontenot. “He knew something wasn’t right and that’s why he came and told us.”

Sydney spent one night at Seattle Children’s Hospital but she’s doing okay. Her family missed the rest of the Super Bowl game but ordered the DVDs so they can finish watching the game.

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Nurse & Teachers Save 7 Year Old in School

Posted by cocreator on January 14, 2014
Events / No Comments

By all accounts, Jackson Bartke seemed to be a normal, healthy, 7-year-old second-grader. But his heart stopped during gym class on Nov. 19. He collapsed.


View First Aid Corps World Map of Lives Saved with AEDs in a larger map

This had never happened to him before. Suddenly, he was unresponsive.

Teachers and staff at Haines Elementary School in New Lenox sprang into action. Ellen Cooke, the physical education teacher, called the nurse, Christine Goeppner, who grabbed a defibrillator and headed to the gym. They were able to restart Jackson’s heart.

Jackson Bartke the Survivor

Jackson Bartke the Survivor

They and others who either called 911, administered CPR or kept the other kids calm were credited for their actions during the lifesaving incident. Jackson’s parents, Rick and Janel Bartke, recognized these “Haines heroes” at the New Lenox School District 122 Board meeting earlier this month.

“It’s amazing to us to still have (Jackson) around,” Rick Bartke said. “Without those people, and that device, and the timing, he wouldn’t be here.”

As Rick Bartke recounted his son’s story, his voice grew weaker, as he apparently grew emotional. The day-to-day activities pass normally, he said. But when he and Janel think about how close they came to losing their son, the tears still come.

“We do plan for the worst but we pray for the best,” Goeppner said, catching her breath, tears in her eyes.

The others recognized were Sharon Tyssen, Aurelia Koncius, Clair Rady, Donnah Simmons, Lisa Annoline and Julie Palucki.

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