Nurse

Teacher & Student Save Student in School

Posted by cocreator on June 21, 2014
Events / No Comments

Due to reinforced training and the immediate response by two Spillane Middle School staff members, a seventh-grade student who went into cardiac arrest during school is alive and well, and back among fellow students.


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The student collapsed on Spillane’s main staircase in between classes on Feb. 28. DMC teacher Sean Stiewert and school nurse Becky Cushen reacted immediately and worked together to help sustain her life in the critical moments before paramedics arrived.

Stiewert, whose classroom is adjacent to the bottom of the staircase, entered the lobby at 10:07 a.m. that Friday morning—the end of second period—to see a group of students stopped on the stairs, collectively pointing toward the bottom three steps where the student had fallen.

Sean Stiewert Becky Cushen the Saviours

Sean Stiewert Becky Cushen the Saviours

“That’s when that ‘coach’s voice’ came out of me pretty loudly,” said Stiewert, a 17-year CFISD veteran and longtime club swim coach. “I told everyone to clear out and use the back staircase, and instructed a student to go get Becky.”

While one staff member called 911, another retrieved one of the school’s six automated external defibrillators (AEDs) so Cushen and Stiewert—both CPR certified—could begin resuscitation.

Cushen, a registered nurse of 28 years who has served CFISD for 4 ½, made the assessment to roll the student onto her back, then immediately began chest compressions.

“We went right into exactly what we had been taught,” Cushen said. “I knew Sean knew CPR just like me, and that made it easy to trust her as we worked together.”

Stiewert followed the AED’s instructions, applying both pads to the student’s chest and clearing space between them and the student while the defibrillator administered a shock.

While still unconscious, the student developed a faint pulse and breaths. The AED instructed Stiewert and Cushen to continue CPR, which they did for what Stiewert estimated was 11 minutes before EMT personnel arrived.

Without the intervention of Spillane staff, she likely would not have survived.

“Their response was immediate, professional and absolutely saved that girl’s life. There’s no question about it,” said Bevin Gordon, CFISD director of health services. “The specific rhythm that the student’s heart was in required a shock from an AED to recover. If she had been anywhere else where an AED was not present, she may not have recovered.”

Shortly following the incident, CFISD support staff and counselors checked in on Stiewert and Cushen. While they were given the option to go home, both stayed for the remainder of the school day.

“I wanted to stay because I didn’t want to just be sitting at home thinking about what had happened,” Stiewert said.

Agreed Cushen, “What if something else had happened again and I had gone home? If someone needed my help I wanted to be there.”

The student was in good spirits and smiling by the time Stiewert and Cushen went to visit her in the hospital with other Spillane teachers the next day.

“I just wanted to hug her,” Stiewert said. “There was a ton of weight lifted off me as soon as I saw her smiling. That’s when I knew everything was good.”

As a result of their actions, Stiewert and Cushen were recognized by the CFISD Board of Trustees during their regularly scheduled meeting on March 13. Dr. Mark Henry, superintendent of schools, presented each of them with the Superintendent Challenge Coin for going above and beyond their normal duties.

“Our number one goal in this district is making sure our students are safe,” Dr. Henry said at the meeting. “Thanks to people like you on our campuses, you are helping fulfill that goal in CFISD.”

The student returned to Spillane this Tuesday to the delight of both Stiewert and Cushen, who are reluctant to claim the spotlight as life-saving heroes.

“A hero is someone who jumps in when their life is in danger. Ours weren’t,” Cushen said. “I feel like I’m just doing my job. I’m really happy I was there. We were in the right place at the right time, and I don’t think it could have gone any smoother.”Due to reinforced training and the immediate response by two Spillane Middle School staff members, a seventh-grade student who went into cardiac arrest during school is alive and well, and back among fellow students.

The student collapsed on Spillane’s main staircase in between classes on Feb. 28. DMC teacher Sean Stiewert and school nurse Becky Cushen reacted immediately and worked together to help sustain her life in the critical moments before paramedics arrived.

Stiewert, whose classroom is adjacent to the bottom of the staircase, entered the lobby at 10:07 a.m. that Friday morning—the end of second period—to see a group of students stopped on the stairs, collectively pointing toward the bottom three steps where the student had fallen.

“That’s when that ‘coach’s voice’ came out of me pretty loudly,” said Stiewert, a 17-year CFISD veteran and longtime club swim coach. “I told everyone to clear out and use the back staircase, and instructed a student to go get Becky.”

While one staff member called 911, another retrieved one of the school’s six automated external defibrillators (AEDs) so Cushen and Stiewert—both CPR certified—could begin resuscitation.

Cushen, a registered nurse of 28 years who has served CFISD for 4 ½, made the assessment to roll the student onto her back, then immediately began chest compressions.

“We went right into exactly what we had been taught,” Cushen said. “I knew Sean knew CPR just like me, and that made it easy to trust her as we worked together.”

Stiewert followed the AED’s instructions, applying both pads to the student’s chest and clearing space between them and the student while the defibrillator administered a shock.

While still unconscious, the student developed a faint pulse and breaths. The AED instructed Stiewert and Cushen to continue CPR, which they did for what Stiewert estimated was 11 minutes before EMT personnel arrived.

Without the intervention of Spillane staff, she likely would not have survived.

“Their response was immediate, professional and absolutely saved that girl’s life. There’s no question about it,” said Bevin Gordon, CFISD director of health services. “The specific rhythm that the student’s heart was in required a shock from an AED to recover. If she had been anywhere else where an AED was not present, she may not have recovered.”

Shortly following the incident, CFISD support staff and counselors checked in on Stiewert and Cushen. While they were given the option to go home, both stayed for the remainder of the school day.

“I wanted to stay because I didn’t want to just be sitting at home thinking about what had happened,” Stiewert said.

Agreed Cushen, “What if something else had happened again and I had gone home? If someone needed my help I wanted to be there.”

The student was in good spirits and smiling by the time Stiewert and Cushen went to visit her in the hospital with other Spillane teachers the next day.

“I just wanted to hug her,” Stiewert said. “There was a ton of weight lifted off me as soon as I saw her smiling. That’s when I knew everything was good.”

As a result of their actions, Stiewert and Cushen were recognized by the CFISD Board of Trustees during their regularly scheduled meeting on March 13. Dr. Mark Henry, superintendent of schools, presented each of them with the Superintendent Challenge Coin for going above and beyond their normal duties.

“Our number one goal in this district is making sure our students are safe,” Dr. Henry said at the meeting. “Thanks to people like you on our campuses, you are helping fulfill that goal in CFISD.”

The student returned to Spillane this Tuesday to the delight of both Stiewert and Cushen, who are reluctant to claim the spotlight as life-saving heroes.

“A hero is someone who jumps in when their life is in danger. Ours weren’t,” Cushen said. “I feel like I’m just doing my job. I’m really happy I was there. We were in the right place at the right time, and I don’t think it could have gone any smoother.”

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Nurse Save Colleague in Elementary School

Posted by cocreator on June 14, 2014
Events / No Comments

Quick action in just minutes is what saved the life of an Upstate man who suffered a heart attack on the job at a Union elementary school.


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With a smile and a thumbs-up, a photo of Samuel Moorman taken by the Union Daily News shows him recovering at Spartanburg Regional Medical Center. It was a happy ending to what staff at Foster Park Elementary called a nightmare situation.

Co-workers found Moorman slumped over, surrounded by the boxes he had been stacking in a back shed. They ran to find the school nurse, Kelly Walton, who set the school’s safety plan in motion.

She said that one person called 911 while others watched the parking lot to direct EMS. Another ran to get the closest AED (automated external defibrillator) and Walton started CPR on Moorman.

“I don’t see myself as a hero at all,” said Walton. “I feel like the Lord puts us in situations where we can help people. Then it’s just in my training to be able to do what we do and hold our head steady and just use the skills that we’ve learned.”

District officials said that all schools got the AEDs as part of a grant back in 2004, but this is the first time any of them needed to be used.

Superintendent Kristi Woodall said that whatever money was spent, is now well worth it.

Moorman is now listed in fair condition, at the CCU at Spartanburg Regional.

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Coaches & Nurses Save Referee at Soccer Game

Posted by cocreator on April 03, 2014
Events / No Comments

It could have been a very different outcome at an Airport High School soccer game last month when one of the game’s referees collapsed.


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Ramon Gil was ready for the Airport High lady Eagles’ scrimmage.

“I was feeling normal as usual,” said Gil. “Got ready for the game, put my stuff in the bag, and went out to the game.”

Gil also said he felt nothing out of the ordinary that day.

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“The last thing I remember, there was a scramble toward the opposing side of the field and so I had to take off, turn on the fire burners, so to speak, to keep up with the girls and they told me I fell mid-field, so I only ran about 25 yards, collapsed,” said Gil.

A referee for 11 years and a Latin dance instructor, Gil considered himself to be in great shape. But none of that mattered that day.

Certified athletic trainer and University of South Carolina graduate student Shea deWeber rushed onto the field from the sidelines.

“We resuscitated him using CPR, we put the AED on him, and delivered one shock,” said deWeber. “After that, his vitals came back and he seemed to be stable until EMS arrived.”

“Everybody sees us taping ankles and looking at a shoulder during a football game. What they don’t see is that we are educated to help out in emergency situations,” said head athletic trainer Karen Edwards.

deWeber acted immediately, relying on his training. Several USC undergrads assisted and two nurses who were sitting in the stands came to his aide.

“I didn’t do anything special, anything different than any other athletic trainer would have done in my situation,” said deWeber.

Gil is grateful.

“There was one artery 100 percent blocked, there was another one, 90 percent blocked and another one was 75 percent blocked,” said Gil.

Four days later, he had a triple bypass.

“They said there was really nothing I could have done to prevented it, that it was genetics,” said Gil.

A soccer ball signed by the team now serves as a reminder of what could have been.

“I really appreciate the fact that I have another chance to do something in life,” said Gil. “I was gone. There was 15 minutes, no heartbeat. If there hadn’t been an AED, the defibrillator on the field, you wouldn’t be able to talk to me today. I wouldn’t be here.”

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Doctor, Nurses & Cops Save Elderly at Mass Walk Event

Posted by cocreator on March 11, 2014
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A 66-year-old man who was part of Utica’s Heart Run and Walk got life-saving help after he collapsed on Saturday, and the help came from a group that says they were just ‘paying it forward.’

Michael Wofford, from Glenfield, in Lewis County, a client of the ARC, was walking at the Saturday event when he collapsed in New Hartford.

‘Team Ben,’ about 200 people associated with Utica Gastroenterologist Dr. Bradley Sklar, was right near him when he fell, at the Burrstone Road and Washington Drive intersection.

Courtney Daviau, RN, who works with Dr. Sklar, was the first to reach him. She tells us they thought he had a seizure, but then Wofford started turning blue and had no pulse. She cleared his mouth with her scarf and began giving him mouth to mouth, without a protective mask. Dr. Sklar began doing CPR.

Both, along with other nurses and medical people on the team, are certified in advanced life support, and Dr. Sklar says that getting the help almost instantly may have saved Wofford’s life, and perhaps saved him from brain damage.

State Troopers Adam Ferstand and Daniel Krajewski were nearby on traffic control duties, and got an AED from their patrol car. Wofford was shocked twice before he was revived, and Daviau says they ‘lost’ him again as he was being put into the ambulance. By last night, she says, he was well enough to eat.

Dr. Sklar got involved with the Heart Association when his son Ben was born with a heart problem, and had open heart surgery in Syracuse at two days old. He says his son (now a high school senior) would have died without that help, and now the team he’s been organizing to walk has paid it back, 18 years later, by saving another life.

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Coaches & Nurse Save Spectator at Basketball Game

Posted by cocreator on February 21, 2014
Events / No Comments

It was just a normal Tuesday afternoon at Marlboro High School for Mark Bramble, the licensed athletic trainer for the Mustangs. He was preparing like any other afternoon for the days games, on this day it was Varsity and JV Girls’ Basketball against Middletown High School. He had prepared the gym, evaluated and treated many injuries and had prepared his athletes for competition using the many injury prevention techniques he is trained to do. Saving somebody’s life certainly wasn’t on his mind.


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But when a specatator suffered a cardiac episode in the stands at the basketball game, Mark put his years of training and education into action and turned a regular day into an unforgettable one. . “The first words out of everyone in the gym was, “Get the Athletic Trainer”. Said Dave Ryden, Athletic Director at Marlboro High School. “Within seconds of hearing that call, my Athletic Trainer, Mark Bramble responded to the scene, had 911 called and retrieved the AED. Mark, a nurse (that happened to be in the gym watching her daughter play), and I proceeded to perform CPR on this gentlemen until the paramedics arrived. Words cannot express enough the importance of having trained healthcare personnel as part of my athletic staff. Mark’s importance to the safety and well-being of the student-athletes and spectators is immeasurable, and he is irreplaceable.”

The nurse, was the first to respond to the injured spectator, she checked for a pulse, there was none present. She yelled for help and began CPR. Mark sprang into action by alerting Marlboro Athletic Director, Dave Ryden, and retrieving the school’s Automated External Defibrillator (AED). Once at the victim, Mark placed the AED on him and assisted with CPR. The AED recommended a shock and it was delivered. CPR was continued for 15-20 minutes and 2 additional shocks were delivered before the victim’s pulse returned and the EMTs began caring for the spectator. The victim was taken by EMT and pararmedics to a local hospital The Varsity game was suspended and the JV game was cancelled due to the event.

When asked about the situation Mark Bramble said, “Having an AED and an Emergency Action Plan in place is vital in protecting our student athletes as well as those who attend interscholastic athletic competitions. Every school should have an athletic trainer as the point person for implementing these emergency action plans and making sure the AED is accessible and in working condition on a daily basis. This incident was obviously a team effort, and the success was directly due to the training of all involved and having a plan in place.”

Mark Bramble, the school’s Athletic Trainer, has been certified as an Athletic Trainer since 1986. He is a member of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association and the Athletic Trainers’ Society of New Jersey. This school year marks his 25th at Marlboro High School. Mark and his family reside in Allentown NJ

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