Hero

Votes for Badge Designs Needed

Posted by cocreator on August 18, 2010
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These are the latest revisions to the badge designs. The only difference between them is the design of the fonts. Please help us to decide which is a better design of the two. Email to us at cocreate (at) firstaidcorps.org with your comments. Thanks!

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Action Figure for Shocker Design

Posted by cocreator on June 15, 2010
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We have chosen, based on feedback that Set 2 is the preferred design for our Hero Badge. The different sets are shown HERE. However, we need to decide on a better action figure for the Shocker design. The set on the right is the revised design. Please help us by giving feedback on what your thoughts are.

hero-badge-designs-rev-1

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Feedback Needed for Hero Badge Designs

Posted by cocreator on June 11, 2010
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Please let us know which set of designs your prefer to cocreate(at)firstaidcorps.org.
If you have designs to contribute, please send them to us too!

Design by Nazmul Kabir, from Desired Design.
hero-badge-designs

The definitions of Seeker, Pumper and Shocker can be found HERE

Some of the feedback given..

“For the graphical icons in the center of the badges, the seeker and the pumper make sense to me intuitively, but the shocker does have the same impact. I prefer the layout of set 2 — the typography adjusting in size to the space seems more interesting and attention getting, plus somehow it reminds me of a heartbeat.” Don F.

“i like set two the best.” Joshua W.

“I agree with Don that the “Shocker” badge is not quite right. I think the reason is that each of the other badges show a person taking action… they associate the stick figure with the name of the badge. Whereas the Shocker badge is less active – it doesn’t have the “actor” in it.” Benjamin R.

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Exponential Stretching of the “Battlefield”

Posted by cocreator on December 09, 2009
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“In antiquity, when you divided the number of people fighting by the area they would typically cover, on average it would take a Greek hoplite and five hundred of his buddies to cover an area the size of a football field. This is why in movies like Spartacus or 300 you can see teh entire army during a battle. By the time of the American Civil War, weapons had gained such power, distance, and lethality that roughly twenty soldiers would fight in that same space of a football field. By World War I, it was just two soldiers in that football field. By World War II, a single soldier occupied roughly five football fields to himself. In Iraq in 2008, the ratio of personnel to territory was roughly 780 football fields per one U.S. soldier.

During World War II, roughly 108 planes were needed to take out a single target. By the time of the airstrikes over Afghanistan in 2001, the ratio had flipped; each plane was destroying 4.07 targets on average per flight.”

Michael E. O’Hanlon, Technological Change and the Future of Warfare

We have the technology to stretch our response to cardiac arrests.

We adopt tools that fit the task, and engage heroes who use these tools.

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What Kind of Hero Are You?

Posted by cocreator on November 28, 2009
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We are looking for badge designs to identify 3 kinds of heroes :

1. Seeker

A seeker is someone who is actively on the lookout for AEDs ( automated external defibrillators ) in public places and in places of work to update us; or someone who in an actual event, seeks out the nearest AED and bring it back to the location of the victim. Do not need to be trained in CPR or in the use of the AED.

2. Pumper

A pumper is someone who does chest compressions on the victim.

3. Shocker

A shocker is someone who activates the AED and deliver shocks to the victim when advised to by the AED.

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