Teacher & Student Save Student in School

Posted by cocreator on June 21, 2014
Events / No Comments

Due to reinforced training and the immediate response by two Spillane Middle School staff members, a seventh-grade student who went into cardiac arrest during school is alive and well, and back among fellow students.


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The student collapsed on Spillane’s main staircase in between classes on Feb. 28. DMC teacher Sean Stiewert and school nurse Becky Cushen reacted immediately and worked together to help sustain her life in the critical moments before paramedics arrived.

Stiewert, whose classroom is adjacent to the bottom of the staircase, entered the lobby at 10:07 a.m. that Friday morning—the end of second period—to see a group of students stopped on the stairs, collectively pointing toward the bottom three steps where the student had fallen.

Sean Stiewert Becky Cushen the Saviours

Sean Stiewert Becky Cushen the Saviours

“That’s when that ‘coach’s voice’ came out of me pretty loudly,” said Stiewert, a 17-year CFISD veteran and longtime club swim coach. “I told everyone to clear out and use the back staircase, and instructed a student to go get Becky.”

While one staff member called 911, another retrieved one of the school’s six automated external defibrillators (AEDs) so Cushen and Stiewert—both CPR certified—could begin resuscitation.

Cushen, a registered nurse of 28 years who has served CFISD for 4 ½, made the assessment to roll the student onto her back, then immediately began chest compressions.

“We went right into exactly what we had been taught,” Cushen said. “I knew Sean knew CPR just like me, and that made it easy to trust her as we worked together.”

Stiewert followed the AED’s instructions, applying both pads to the student’s chest and clearing space between them and the student while the defibrillator administered a shock.

While still unconscious, the student developed a faint pulse and breaths. The AED instructed Stiewert and Cushen to continue CPR, which they did for what Stiewert estimated was 11 minutes before EMT personnel arrived.

Without the intervention of Spillane staff, she likely would not have survived.

“Their response was immediate, professional and absolutely saved that girl’s life. There’s no question about it,” said Bevin Gordon, CFISD director of health services. “The specific rhythm that the student’s heart was in required a shock from an AED to recover. If she had been anywhere else where an AED was not present, she may not have recovered.”

Shortly following the incident, CFISD support staff and counselors checked in on Stiewert and Cushen. While they were given the option to go home, both stayed for the remainder of the school day.

“I wanted to stay because I didn’t want to just be sitting at home thinking about what had happened,” Stiewert said.

Agreed Cushen, “What if something else had happened again and I had gone home? If someone needed my help I wanted to be there.”

The student was in good spirits and smiling by the time Stiewert and Cushen went to visit her in the hospital with other Spillane teachers the next day.

“I just wanted to hug her,” Stiewert said. “There was a ton of weight lifted off me as soon as I saw her smiling. That’s when I knew everything was good.”

As a result of their actions, Stiewert and Cushen were recognized by the CFISD Board of Trustees during their regularly scheduled meeting on March 13. Dr. Mark Henry, superintendent of schools, presented each of them with the Superintendent Challenge Coin for going above and beyond their normal duties.

“Our number one goal in this district is making sure our students are safe,” Dr. Henry said at the meeting. “Thanks to people like you on our campuses, you are helping fulfill that goal in CFISD.”

The student returned to Spillane this Tuesday to the delight of both Stiewert and Cushen, who are reluctant to claim the spotlight as life-saving heroes.

“A hero is someone who jumps in when their life is in danger. Ours weren’t,” Cushen said. “I feel like I’m just doing my job. I’m really happy I was there. We were in the right place at the right time, and I don’t think it could have gone any smoother.”Due to reinforced training and the immediate response by two Spillane Middle School staff members, a seventh-grade student who went into cardiac arrest during school is alive and well, and back among fellow students.

The student collapsed on Spillane’s main staircase in between classes on Feb. 28. DMC teacher Sean Stiewert and school nurse Becky Cushen reacted immediately and worked together to help sustain her life in the critical moments before paramedics arrived.

Stiewert, whose classroom is adjacent to the bottom of the staircase, entered the lobby at 10:07 a.m. that Friday morning—the end of second period—to see a group of students stopped on the stairs, collectively pointing toward the bottom three steps where the student had fallen.

“That’s when that ‘coach’s voice’ came out of me pretty loudly,” said Stiewert, a 17-year CFISD veteran and longtime club swim coach. “I told everyone to clear out and use the back staircase, and instructed a student to go get Becky.”

While one staff member called 911, another retrieved one of the school’s six automated external defibrillators (AEDs) so Cushen and Stiewert—both CPR certified—could begin resuscitation.

Cushen, a registered nurse of 28 years who has served CFISD for 4 ½, made the assessment to roll the student onto her back, then immediately began chest compressions.

“We went right into exactly what we had been taught,” Cushen said. “I knew Sean knew CPR just like me, and that made it easy to trust her as we worked together.”

Stiewert followed the AED’s instructions, applying both pads to the student’s chest and clearing space between them and the student while the defibrillator administered a shock.

While still unconscious, the student developed a faint pulse and breaths. The AED instructed Stiewert and Cushen to continue CPR, which they did for what Stiewert estimated was 11 minutes before EMT personnel arrived.

Without the intervention of Spillane staff, she likely would not have survived.

“Their response was immediate, professional and absolutely saved that girl’s life. There’s no question about it,” said Bevin Gordon, CFISD director of health services. “The specific rhythm that the student’s heart was in required a shock from an AED to recover. If she had been anywhere else where an AED was not present, she may not have recovered.”

Shortly following the incident, CFISD support staff and counselors checked in on Stiewert and Cushen. While they were given the option to go home, both stayed for the remainder of the school day.

“I wanted to stay because I didn’t want to just be sitting at home thinking about what had happened,” Stiewert said.

Agreed Cushen, “What if something else had happened again and I had gone home? If someone needed my help I wanted to be there.”

The student was in good spirits and smiling by the time Stiewert and Cushen went to visit her in the hospital with other Spillane teachers the next day.

“I just wanted to hug her,” Stiewert said. “There was a ton of weight lifted off me as soon as I saw her smiling. That’s when I knew everything was good.”

As a result of their actions, Stiewert and Cushen were recognized by the CFISD Board of Trustees during their regularly scheduled meeting on March 13. Dr. Mark Henry, superintendent of schools, presented each of them with the Superintendent Challenge Coin for going above and beyond their normal duties.

“Our number one goal in this district is making sure our students are safe,” Dr. Henry said at the meeting. “Thanks to people like you on our campuses, you are helping fulfill that goal in CFISD.”

The student returned to Spillane this Tuesday to the delight of both Stiewert and Cushen, who are reluctant to claim the spotlight as life-saving heroes.

“A hero is someone who jumps in when their life is in danger. Ours weren’t,” Cushen said. “I feel like I’m just doing my job. I’m really happy I was there. We were in the right place at the right time, and I don’t think it could have gone any smoother.”

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Official Launch of Crowdsav

Posted by cocreator on August 03, 2012
News, Technology, Updates / No Comments

Details at www.crowdsav.com

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Colleagues Save Co-Worker in Kitchen

Posted by cocreator on June 14, 2014
Events / No Comments

A Contra Costa County Juvenile Hall cook who fell unconscious during a heart attack in the facility’s kitchen credits the two Contra Costa Health services nurses on duty with saving his life.


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Nurses Liz Maaske and Mary Vesey revived their coworker, Edward Taraskewich, using CPR and an automated external defibrillator shortly after he suffered a cardiac arrest on the morning of Jan. 6. When the nurses found Taraskewich, he had no pulse and was not breathing, according to Will Harper, spokesman for Contra Costa Health Services.

In recognition of their efforts, the county’s Emergency Medical Services Division awarded the two women, along with emergency responders, a “Certificate of Heroism” in a ceremony attended by Taraskewich on March 12.

Maaske and Vesey, who have a combined 35 years of experience as nurses at at the John A. Davis Juvenile Hall were trained to administer CPR and use a defibrillator, but this was the first time they had had to use them on the job, according to Harper.

The nurses were able to revive Taraskewich before paramedics arrived, according to Harper.

Taraskewich had worked with Maaske and Vesey for 14 years and celebrated his 63rd birthday earlier this month as a result of the women’s swift, life-saving actions.

“I would never have seen this day without Liz and Mary,” Taraskewich said. “They saved my life.”

Taraskewich said he plans to return to his job as lead cook next week.

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Bystanders & Security Guard Save Moviegoer

Posted by cocreator on June 14, 2014
Events / No Comments

A woman is thanking moviegoers and mall security for saving her husband’s life.


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Christopher Mazurek is in the hospital recovering after his heart stopped twice.

“I thought my world was just going to fall apart,” said his wife, Jean Mazurek.

Christopher Mazurek the Survivor

Christopher Mazurek the Survivor

Jean Mazurek said the 44-year-old father of two girls was at Cinemark movie theater at Pittsburgh Mills Mall Saturday, where he had gone to see a movie.

“He came back from the restroom and he was coming up the aisle when he collapsed. From that point, he doesn’t remember what happened,” she said.

Jean Mazurek said doctors told her Christopher Mazurek had heart disease and suffered a massive heart attack with 99 percent blockage of blood flow.

“It didn’t look well for a while,” said Jean Mazurek.

Frazier Township patrolman Aaron Scott arrived moments after the call.

“There were two civilians in there watching a movie who came out of the stands and start administering CPR to the gentleman,” said Scott.

Jean Mazurek thanks the mall security guard for using a portable defibrillator to get her husband’s heart beating again.

“They’re truly heroes to me, and if there were more people like that, it would be a better place,” said Jean Mazurek.

Christopher Mazurek will likely be in the Intensive Care Unit at West Penn Hospital for several weeks, but he is expected to make a full recovery.

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Nurse Save Colleague in Elementary School

Posted by cocreator on June 14, 2014
Events / No Comments

Quick action in just minutes is what saved the life of an Upstate man who suffered a heart attack on the job at a Union elementary school.


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With a smile and a thumbs-up, a photo of Samuel Moorman taken by the Union Daily News shows him recovering at Spartanburg Regional Medical Center. It was a happy ending to what staff at Foster Park Elementary called a nightmare situation.

Co-workers found Moorman slumped over, surrounded by the boxes he had been stacking in a back shed. They ran to find the school nurse, Kelly Walton, who set the school’s safety plan in motion.

She said that one person called 911 while others watched the parking lot to direct EMS. Another ran to get the closest AED (automated external defibrillator) and Walton started CPR on Moorman.

“I don’t see myself as a hero at all,” said Walton. “I feel like the Lord puts us in situations where we can help people. Then it’s just in my training to be able to do what we do and hold our head steady and just use the skills that we’ve learned.”

District officials said that all schools got the AEDs as part of a grant back in 2004, but this is the first time any of them needed to be used.

Superintendent Kristi Woodall said that whatever money was spent, is now well worth it.

Moorman is now listed in fair condition, at the CCU at Spartanburg Regional.

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Wife Saves Husband during Snow Shovelling

Posted by cocreator on June 09, 2014
Events / No Comments

My husband, Bob, used to refer to the automated external defibrillator (AED) that I bought for our house as “the $1,500 shelf ornament.”


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He thought it was a complete waste of money. But I wanted it because we live so far from emergency medical care.

In December 2011, that shelf ornament saved my husband’s life.

Bob and I were outside our three-unit motel. We live in tiny Coalmont, BC, population 85, where we’re the proud owners of the Mozey-On-Inn. That day we were shovelling the driveway to get ready for guests.

Bob Sterne the Survivor

Bob Sterne the Survivor

Bob, then 63, shovelled near the bottom of the driveway, and I was clearing the heavy snow near the door. I turned and noticed that Bob had fallen. I assumed it was because his replacement knee gave out. I even joked with him to get back up. But he didn’t respond.

I ran down the driveway, turned him over and saw that his eyes were rolled back in his head. I hurried inside to call 911. Meanwhile our neighbours rushed over and began performing CPR on Bob.

When I heard someone shout, “There’s no pulse! He’s not breathing!” I shoved the phone in my pocket, grabbed the defibrillator and ran to Bob’s side. I put the phone on the ground so the operator could hear us.

As we placed the electrode pads on Bob’s chest, the AED began analyzing his condition and giving audio instructions.

It said to stand back and administer the first shock, so I pushed the button. After a second shock, Bob suddenly took a gulp of breath and opened his eyes. But we weren’t out of the woods yet. Bob’s breathing was raspy and even though his eyes were open, he wasn’t responding. I got blankets and we tried to keep him warm while we waited.

The ambulance was on its way but had to travel more than 20 kilometres over icy roads. Finally, 45 minutes later, the paramedics loaded Bob into the ambulance. I followed with a neighbour to the hospital in Princeton, the nearest town.

After a stop at the regional hospital, Bob was sent for in-depth testing at Vancouver General Hospital, where he would stay for a week. The tests showed that Bob’s heart was actually in great shape, with next to no clogs in his arteries. But doctors eventually found the problem: His heart wasn’t sending the right electrical signals to keep a steady beat.

Bob had an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) installed. It’s a small, battery-powered device that sends an electrical impulse to his heart if it starts to beat an abnormal rhythm. It was a surprisingly minor operation. Bob was released the day after his surgery.

More than two years later, Bob is doing well. He lost 15 pounds, and his ICD has never had to do anything (but it is a nice insurance policy).

To make sure it’s working well, Bob uses a special device to send regular readings from his ICD to the regional hospital’s heart clinic. They still want to see Bob once a year in person, but having this great device means we don’t have to drive to Penticton in the winter months.

Bob has the OK to shovel snow again, in moderation. And he no longer makes jokes about our AED. Now he’ll tell anyone who will listen that all small communities should have an AED at a central location and everyone should know where it is.

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